Posted by: bonmac | September 14, 2014

Ontario Wanderings: Port Dalhousie, Ontario

My next destination was Brock University’s special collections in St. Catherines.  This is the Loyalist Collection.  As far as I know neither my Boardmans or Browns were Loyalist having immigrated to Canada at a later date.  The Browns where here in 1831 and the Boardman’s came probably mid 1850’s.  Too late for the Revolution.  This does not mean that Browns were not Loyalists.  It just means my family on my mother’s side were not.

However, my father’s side has the potential for Loyalists to be included in his family tree. I just don’t know for sure, so I have decided it is time to dive into Loyalist research.  I will post about that on my The Man Who Lived Airplanes blog as I travel along on my trip:  http://macdonellfamily.wordpress.com/

Here is the link to the Loyalist collection at Brock:  http://www.brocku.ca/library/collections/special-collections-archives

and

http://www.brockloyalisthistorycollection.ca/

After viewing the Canadian side of Niagara Falls I headed to St. Catharines and the Heritage House Bed and Breakfast, which was close to Brock University by about 5 minutes.  The next morning I headed up to Port Dalhousie to take a look at the south end of Lake Ontario and the lighthouse that was there.  I found my way up Ontario Street and turned onto Lighthouse Road and there was a parking area.  Much to my delight there were two lighthouses and I could see Toronto faintly in the distance (it is there but barely).  This was a small canal with a pier on one side and a walkway on my side of the waterway.

Lighthouses Port Dalhousie

Lighthouses Port Dalhousie near and far

 

Port Dalhousie in Ontario

Port Dalhousie in Ontario

How lovely, wish I could dally here.

Posted by: bonmac | September 12, 2014

Ontario Wanderings: Niagara Falls the Canadian side…

There is a video on YouTube about walking the Rainbow Bridge to Canada.  I decided to just pay the toll and drive across it.  My time with the Canadian Border agent was brief but pleasant.  The turn to the Falls is clearly marked — THE FALLS or you go to Toronto.  You then do a 180 degree turn to River Drive and that becomes Niagara Parkway.

A busy skyline

A busy skyline

My destination was the visitor center and Elements Restaurant. I had figured out where it was when I was on the other side so I had an idea. It was the castle like building close to the other side of Horseshoe Falls.  I also spent some time trying to figure out where the parking was using Google Earth from home. You have to follow the signs to parking which is beyond a big building and they charge you $20.00 to park so make the most of it. I did find a spot right across from where I wanted to be.  So I was happy that I didn’t have to walk too far.

Visitor Center at Niagara Falls Ontario

Visitor Center at Niagara Falls Ontario

The US side of Niagara is amazing but the Canadian side is AWESOME.  You really get the full view of the river and all of the falls. You can see them clearly except of course for the mist that rises from Horseshoe Falls.  It sort of reminded me a little of Old Faithful in Yellowstone only this mist is constant. As the day progresses the mist becomes less and you begin to see the outline of Horseshoe Falls more clearly.

Thru the mist...

Thru the mist…barely see the whole outline of Horseshoe Falls…

I decided that I would do the Journey Behind the Falls. It is timed to get in but self-directed. It was $18.00 at the Visitor Center. I was early and they let me in without a wait.  They take you down the elevator and you walk this cramped ugly yellow or was it dirty white tunnel to the main viewing area.  Things to watch for are the walkway which is wet and can be slippery. If you are claustrophobic, well just take a deep breath.

The First viewing area for JBTheF

The First viewing area for JBTheF

The water just cascades over the edge of the cliff and tumbles down:

Cascading water

Cascading water

I did not get as wet as I thought but the wind shifts and can send the mist your way. I was able to pack my video camera and digital to get some good photos but barely kept them under the slicker they hand you because the wind would try to lift it into your face.  You can recycle them which is a nice touch.

Lower viewing area for Journey Behind the Falls

Lower viewing area for Journey Behind the Falls

The rest of the tunnel has information boards explaining the history of the Falls. The Niagara River flows north from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario dropping at various locations till it gets to its destination.

Up on top you have this long walkway that parallels the river with of course a railing with pillars that the brave like to climb on to take photos. Behaving like a tourist I made my way along the river railing toward Bridal Veil and American Falls.  Bridal Veil is the smaller one on the right. I could have gone to where I was right in front of it but the crowd of people had increased and the walkway had reduced.  If you see the tower to the left you can access that from the mainland part of the State Park on the US side.

American Falls and Bridal Veil

American Falls and Bridal Veil

The tourist boats come up really close to the Falls and the people are dressed in pink or blue slickers. You can see the wind whipping them about.

Tourist Boats

Tourist Boats

The Visitor Center looks like an old castle (see above photo).  They have the tickets to purchase for different attractions, shops to buy things and food as well. The food is fast food with several restaurants including Elements.

The gift shop was very large and had many things in it.  I purchased a T-shirt so I now have one for the USA side and one for the Canadian side. Of course there were lots of stuff animals and I was strong and didn’t buy but I was very charmed by several very large creatures:  a moose, a bear and here is the wolf:

Isn't he grand!

Isn’t he grand!

I had made my reservation for the Elements Restaurant online for 1:30 pm but decided to try at 12:30 pm and they let me in and seated me right at the window and Horseshoe Falls was so close I could almost touch it.  I dallied the time since I was early in my schedule and asked questions of my waitress who was very knowledgeable.  I had observed several structures that I was curious about and she said that there was a bridge in the distance and that they diverted the water at night for electricity.  There were other levels that looked like they also were part of the system. My lunch was good the steak was tender but a little too cooked.  I thought it would fill me up but alas it did not, I was hungry later. The view was the best and I recommend that you try this restaurant if you go there.  It is not any more expensive than other restaurants.  Oh, I would go there and partake of the refreshments with the thought that your hotel room is waiting for you.  I was going to be driving so I had to behave myself.

The view from my table

The view from my table. Can you see the green in the water at the crest? It changes depending on the weather.

The parking attendant had given me some brochures and when I finally sat down to read them I realized that I had barely scratched the surface of all the activities and tourist attractions one could participate in the area. I recommended getting a brochure in advance so you can study it.  It is not just for honeymooners anymore, it is now filled with activities for a family as well.  I found the websites not that helpful so do some more digging.

The Skylon Tower

The Skylon Tower – the saucer shape, not the chunky casino on the left

I was particularly interested in the Skylon Tower which is 520 ft high from land.  The Space Needle is at a height of  605 ft. from sea level.  I know I am a snob. Okay, okay…the Skylon Tower is 775 ft. from the bottom of the falls.

PS:  The flowers are for you Barbara.

The next post has to do with Loyalists, so I encourage you to go over to The Man Who Lived Airplanes and see what I discovered.

 

My second big trip to Ontario was finally here and my flight left at 6 am and three hours later I was in Chicago.  The minute I got off the plane I recognized the little end of the terminal area as having been a place I have spent time before.  Fortunately, my connecting flight gate was just a little way down the concourse.  I have gone running around the Chicago airport to get to my gate and then had them change it frequently.  All went well with this trip and I landed in Buffalo, New York early by about 20 minutes and my luggage had a priority tag on it which made me very happy.  The car rentals are just across the street from the baggage claim so that was very easy.

They gave me a Toyota Corolla which I have had before.  I also decided to get GPS and they handed me a handheld Garamond with something like a bean bag.  It is actually helping and I am using it to tick off the streets relying on my maps I have made which don’t always give me the detail I need.  They did not give me instructions for it.  I am use to other GPS systems for my RAV4 and on my cell phone like Google Maps or Scout.  I can’t use them in Canada because of the cost of data download, even though I did get that set up with our carrier for international travel.

My first destination was Niagara Falls, New York.  I wanted to see that big falls that is so famous. Two honks later (it is New York) I was in Niagara Falls and found the Days Inn which is right across the street from the Rainbow Bride which is a toll bridge. Yes, it is a toll bridge charging $3.50 for USA and $3.75 for Canadian.  I was going to go across it the next day.

Rainbow Bridge Entry

Rainbow Bridge Entry

Days Inn Niagara Falls, NY

Days Inn Niagara Falls, NY

Unfortunately I arrived in Niagara Falls and the light was fading although there was a very nice sunset over the Canadian side.  It is not always easy to get the colors in the photo that your eye sees but this is pretty cool

Niagara Falls NY Sunset

Niagara Falls NY Sunset

So why was I in Niagara Falls? Well it was the start of my second big trip to Ontario to find out more about the Brown, Boardman and McDonald families and see more of Ontario..  I am not going to say too much because I think it is fun to surprise you. So you will have to read this blog the Boardmans and Browns and also go to The Man Who Lived Airplanes blog to see what I post there.  I might also put a post or two on the Solomon Goss blog.  I will try to remember to tell you to go to another blog for more details but if I don’t just remember to check out the side panel of this blog and you will find the link.

I was up early and had breakfast at the Denny’s that was in the hotel and made my way to the Niagara Falls State Park http://www.niagarafallsstatepark.com/.  It is the oldest state park in the United States.  It is advertised as free and open 24 hours but they do charge $10.00 for parking.  The parking lot is well situated on Goat Island so you don’t have to walk too far to view the two falls areas.  It was not hard to get to the park, I just went south on Rainbow Street and came to a roundabout that took me to the turn to the right to Goat Island.  It took just minutes to get there.

As you walk toward the viewing area you see this green park area.

Niagara State Park

Niagara State Park

Introducing Horseshoe Falls

Introducing Horseshoe Falls

It is very flat at the top and then Wow, I did not realize that the water just plunges straight down at Horseshoe Falls.

To the edge

To the edge

 

Off the edge it goes

Off the edge it goes

The water plunges down to the rocks below

The water plunges down to the rocks below

Bridal Veil and American Falls are easy to get to you just head north past the food and gift store area.  The lower area was blocked off for some reason.  There were rainbows everywhere.

Bridal Veil and American Falls.

Bridal Veil and American Falls.

It was time to check out the Canadian side of Niagara Falls.

Posted by: bonmac | August 29, 2014

The Children of William Brown & Elsie: Henry Brown

Henry Brown was born on 5 November 1820 in County Longford, Ireland and he died on 18 September 1899 in Oil Springs, Lambton Co., Ontario.  He married Margaret Orr about 1840 in Hastings County, Ontario.  She was born about 1824 in Belfast, Ireland and died about 1900 in Oil Springs, Lambton Co., Ontario. Both are buried in the Oil Springs Cemetery.  Margaret is probably the daughter of Joseph Orr and Mary Carter.

Henry settled in Hastings County, Ontario and had land there.

Hastings and Prince Edward Counties (Ontario Map Ref #28 and #29) Illustrated historical atlas of the counties of Hastings and Prince Edward, Ont. Toronto : H. Belden & Co., 1878.

The Canadian Digital Atlas Project:

http://digital.library.mcgill.ca/countyatlas/searchmapframes.php

Henry’s story is best represented by the biography written about him in the Lambton County history book:

Source:  Commemorative Biographical Record of the County of Lambton, Ontario., Hill Binding Co., 1906, Compiler J.H. Beers & Co., Toronto.

Lambton County History book

Lambton County History book

pg. 128: Henry Brown father of Mrs. Yates, was born Nov. 5, 1820 in Ireland. He was of Holland descent, however, his ancestors having come over with King William through his parents, William and Alice (Tymond) Brown, were also born in Ireland, where she latter died. She was a granddaughter of John Tymond, the military engineer who built the Tymond iron bridge, in County Limerick, Ireland, which was name after him. After his wife’s death William Brown came to Canada with his family and settled in Hastings County, where his life closed. He was the father of a family of twelve children, all of whom have passed away. The father of Mrs. Yates was the youngest of this large family and he was afforded excellent educational advantages in Ireland. After coming to Canada he taught school for a short time, after which he engaged in farming. On Dec. 5, 1840, Henry Brown as married to Miss Margaret Orr, who was born in 1824, near the city of Belfast, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Carter) Orr, who were born and reared in Ireland, and died there. Henry Brown was a farmer in his younger days, and later on engaged in work as a clerk for the village of Sterling, Hastings County, and his penmanship may yet be seen in the old deeds and official papers of that time. During the Mackenzie rebellion he served as soldier for three years and was honorably discharged. In 1861 Mr. Brown removed to Lambton County and settled in Oil Springs, where he became interested in the handling of real estate and in the production of oil. In 1863 he was elected the first town clerk of Oil Springs, a position he held with the greatest efficiency for a number of years. He was foremost in all progressive movements here, was a charter member of the Masonic fraternity, and filled official positions in the lodge for a considerable period. During his whole life he was an upright, honorable, public spirited man solicitous for the welfare of the community. The death of this good citizen took place Sept. 18, 1899, and that of his widow, in the following year, the only survivor of their family being their daughter Mrs. Yates.

Henry and Margaret’s daughter Ann Jane Brown was born the 28 December, 1841 in Niagara, Ontario. She appears to be the only child of this couple. This implies that Henry was on the move while his brothers Thomas and Philip stayed in Hastings Co., Ontario.

Ann Jane Brown was married on 22 March 1871 to George Yates.  George was the son of Benjamin Yates and Phebe.  He was born about 1839 in Leeds Co., Ontario. Ann was born in Niagara to Henry and Margaret Brown.  George was a merchant. The marriage took place at the residence of the bride’s parents by Rev. G.A. Mitchell in Lambton County, Ontario.

Source:  Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1801-1928, Archives of Ontario, MS932, Reel 4.  These are at Ancestry.com with originals.

A search of the 1851 and 1861 Canadian Census did not find Henry, Ann or Margaret Brown listed.  So we cannot follow his movements till he appears in 1871.

Henry and family appear in the 1871 Canadian Census for Oil Springs, Lambton Co., Ontario, Dist. 4 Lambton, SD, Oil Springs, pg. 1, Ontario.

Line 3, 3, 2, 2, Brown Henry, M, age 50, born Ireland, Episcopal, Irish, Town Clerk, M., Brown, Margaret, F, age 47, born Ireland, Episcopal, Irish, M, Yates, George, M, age 32, born Ontario, [I Meth E], German, Oil Dealer, M, March/ Yates, Ann Jane, F, age 29, born Ontario, Episcopal, Irish, M. 

Henry is residing in Oil Springs in the 1881 Canadian Census, Oil Springs, Lambton Co., Ontario, District 179, John Q. Branerd, pg. 9.

Line 20, 41, 41, Brown, Henry, M, age 61, born Ireland, C. of England, Ireland, C. of E., English, Village Clerk, M. Brown, Margret, F, age 58, born Ireland, Ch of England, Scotch, M. Line 22, 42, 42, Yates, George, M, age 43, born Ohio, Meth E, Irish, Store Keeper, M. Yates, Ann. James F age 40, born Ontario, Meth E., Irish, M. 

Yates, Edmund, M age 9, born Ontario, ME, Irish. Yates, Henrietta, F age 7, born Ontario, ME, Irish

pg. 10
Yates Charlotte, Fem age 5, born Ontario, M E., Irish. Yates, Harriet C, F, age 3, born Ontario, M E, Irish, Yates, Frederick C., Ma, 6/12 June, born Ontario, ME.. Irish. Lamott, George, M age 18 born Ontario, ME, Irish (faded writing)

Henry is still living in Oil Springs in the 1891 Canadian Census for Oil Springs, Lambton Co., Ontario, Dist. 81, East Lambton, 4 April 1891, pg. 10.

Line 1, W2/9, 44, Brown, Henry, M, age 70 M, born Ireland, parents Ireland, CE, Lan Agent. Brown, Margret, F, age 66, M, [ ] Ireland, parents born Ireland, CE, both can read and write.

Research from a cousin reads:

Anna Jane Brown married on 22 March 1871 to George C. Yates. He was born in Athens, Leeds Co., Ontario on 2 September, 1838 a son of Benjamin Yates 1812 to 1888 and Phoebe Cornell (1813-1888). Both were born in Canada and moved to near Sarnia and died there leaving George Cornell Yates and a sister Sarah. Sarah apparently later married William Yates.  In 1861 George C. Yates moved to Oil Springs and worked in Oil production and later as a merchant. He worked in the mercantile business until 1894, when he lost his business.  Yates was also the postmaster for twenty years at Oil Springs, as well as the tax collector and assessor.  In politics he was a staunch Reformer and he died on November 16, 1901 and was survived by his widow.  Anna Jane Yates then left Canada and moved to Connecticut, settling in Waterbury. Her home was on 360 Highland Ave. Anna Jane died on 9 November 1935 being ill for several years. She was 94 years old.  She was survived by her six children.  The body was taken back to Oil Springs for burial in the family plot. 

Ann and George Yates had the following children:

1. Edmund H. Yates born 31 December 1871 in Oil Springs, Lambton Co., Ontario, He married Susan Shepherd of Enniskillen and they had Eunice, Helen V. and Georgina E. Yates. He was educated in a business college in Chatham, Ontario. He moved to New Haven, Connecticut where he worked for the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railway. There is a birth record for Edmund Henry with the county.

2. Henrietta Yates was born 7 December 1873 Oil Springs, Lambton Co., Ontario.She moved to Connecticut where she worked as a nurse.  She did not marry.  She died on 5 June 1970 in Waterbury, Litchfield Co., Connecticut at age 96. . She is buried in the Oil Springs Cemetery.

From the Waterbury Republican, Saturday, June 6, 1970:

Miss Yates’ Rites to Be Private: Private funeral services for Miss Henrietta Yates, 360 Highland Ave., retired industrial nurse at Anaconda American-Brass, will be held Monday at the Alderson Funeral Home, 70 Central Ave., followed by cremation.  Burial will be in Oil Springs Cemetery in Canada at the convenience of the family.  She died Friday at Waterbury Extended Care Facility, Watertown, after a long illness.  Born in Oil Springs, Ontario, daughter of the late George Cornell and Ann Jane (Brown) Yates. She was a nurse at Anaconda for 25 years, retiring a number of years ago. She attended St. Barnabus Hospital School of nursing in Minneapolis, Minn. Surviving are a sister, Gertrude A. Yates and a brother, Clifford R. Yates both of this city. There are no calling hours. Friends are asked to omit flowers. 

3. Charlotte G. Yates was born about 1875 in Lambton Co., Ontario. She became a nurse in Sarnia and then moved to Minneapolis.

4. Harriett Caroline Yates was born about 1878 in Lambton Co.Ontario and died about May 1887 in Oil Springs.  She is buried in the Oil Springs Cemetery.

5. Frederick Charles Yates was born about June 1880 in Oil Springs, Lambton Co., Ontario. He died in 1957 in Oil Springs and is buried in the Oil Springs Cemetery. He married a Mary Wasel of Elizabethport, NJ.  He worked as a machinist in New York.

6.  Clifford Russell Yates was born 4 March 1883 in Oil Springs. He worked in the office of the Oil Springs Chronicle and learned the printing business. He later worked in the bookkeeping office of Coe Brass Works at Ansonia, Connecticut.  He died 13 March 1973 in Waterbury, Litchfield Co., Connecticut. He is buried in the Oil Springs Cemetery.

7. Gertrude Alma Yates was born 13 August, 1886  in Oil Springs. She was known as “Queenie or Queen.” According to family news she didn’t marry staying at home to care for her aging mother.  She was cremated 16 April 1976 in Corona, Riverside, California. Service were held at 3 pm at the First Congregational Church, Grimes Funeral Home. A letter from the newspaper indicates that she may have married but her married name is not clear.  She may have had Winifred (Allen) Arnold, Corona, California, Olleta (Clarence) Jones, Independence, MO., Peggy (Richard) Mulock, Palo Alto, Calif., Darlyn (Herb) Jahn, Banning Calif., and Helen (Bob) Atwood also of Banning, Calif.  Sons would be Alton, Oceanside, Kenneth, Culver City, Neville, Banning, CA and Larry, Rolla, Mo.  The information is from an obituary from the Corona-Noroc Independent which was not copied but abstracted.

Ann (Ada) Jane Brown Yates has several obituaries:

This appeared in the Waterbury Republican on Nov. 10, 1935:

Mrs. Ann Yates.  Mrs. Ann J. Yates, widow of George C. Yates, died at her home 360 Highland avenue, yesterday. She was born in Old Fort Niagara, Ontario, Canada, December 29, 1841, the only child of Henry and Margaret brown, formerly of Sterling, Ontario.  Mrs. Yates was a resident of Oil Springs, Ontario for 50 years and of Ansonia for five years. She came to Waterbury in 1917.  Mrs. Yates is survived by three sons, Edmund H. and Clifford R., both of this city and Frederick of Thomaston; three daughters, Gertrude and Henrietta of this city, and Charlotte of Minneapolis, Minn. Private funeral services will be held tomorrow. Burial will be in Canada.

Another obituary notice describes the same information as above but gives more detail about the funeral:

The funeral was held from Centenary United Church, Oil Springs on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. The service was conducted y the Rev. G. Oliver. Interment was at Oil Springs Cemetery. 

There is a short mention of the of Henry Brown in the local newspaper for September 20, 1899.  Died – Brown in Oil Springs on Monday Sept 18th, 1899, Henry brown, aged 78 years and 10 months.  His death is also recorded in the Schedule C of Deaths. page 479, Brown Henry Sept 15, 78 – 10 -13 age, born Ireland, _________disability, Ch. of England.

Henry's Death

Henry’s Death

Apparently Henry was a lieutenant out of Oil Springs.  He is on the roll call for 1837-1838 – Lambton County L’extracts, Canada’s Gallant Volunteers.

As usual there is more to be done in researching this family.

Posted by: bonmac | August 27, 2014

The Children of William Brown & Elsie: Phillip Brown

Brown Land in Rawdon Twp. 1871

Brown Land in Rawdon Twp. 1878

Phillip Brown was a son of William and Elsie/Alice Brown and he settled in Hastings County and remained there after migrating to the area from Ireland.  Please verify the information presented below, it has been handed from researcher to researcher and I am slowly finding documentation that shows it is correct.

It is stated that he was born 29 March 1817 in County Longford, Ireland.  He died on 7 April 1895 in Rawdon Twp., Hastings Co., Ontario and is buried in the Stirling Cemetery.

Philip married Margaret McMurray about 1840 in Hastings.  She was also born in Longford, Ireland about 1819 and died in Rawdon, Hastings Co., Ontario on 10 February 1878 and is buried in the Stirling Cemetery.

When I visited that cemetery in 2012, I did not get a picture of their tombstones but hope to remedy that soon.  I was having trouble finding graves and trying to figure out the published cemetery book.

It is suggested that Mark McMurray and Diana/Diane Leggett/Legate were her parents. Another Brown researcher Mrs. Freddie Knight who descends from this family provided a great deal of this information. I have to give her credit for this information. Unfortunately, we lost Freddie awhile back but I am grateful for her research. There is a 1993 letter she wrote to Bob Hayes about the family of Richard Brown and it is really well done and it was interesting to see her find the same things that I had 10 years later.

Mark McMurray was born about 1786 in Crossmachihilly, Seagoe Parish, Armagh, Northern Ireland and died about 1845 in Rawdon District, Hastings Co., Canada West.

Diana/Diane Leggett/Legate McMurray was born about 1876 in Seagoe Parish, Northern Ireland and died about 1871 in Rawdown District, Hastings Co., Canada West.  I have not verified this information.

I found reference to a Diane McMurray in the 1861 Canadian Census in Rawdon Twp., Hastings Co., Ontario, C-1033, page #26.  This Diana appears below the Thomas Vance Family information on Line 18. The age is difficult to read and might be 45 years old rather than 75? So it might be the daughter?

Line 49 Diana McMury, Ireland, C of England, [75], female, widowed, 1 female
Mark McMurray, Canada, C of England, 14, male, S, 1 male

Margaret had about 7 siblings:  William McMurray (1815-1868), Fanny (Francis) Ann McMurray (1821 to 1874), Maria McMurray (1822-1906), Mark McMurray (1825 -_), Diana McMurray (1827 -1892), Elizabeth or Matilda Jane McMurry (1832 to 1904), and Lucinda McMurray (1832 to ____)

Philip & Margaret Brown, photo courtesy of Bob Hayes

Philip & Margaret Brown, photo courtesy of Bob Hayes

Philip Brown does appear in the Canadian County Atlas Digital Project:  http://digital.library.mcgill.ca/countyatlas/search.htm

You can pull up a list of those in Hastings County under the Brown name at this link:  http://digital.library.mcgill.ca/countyatlas/printresults.php

E 1/2 lot 5, Concession 8, 12 Mar 1839, Record CCB3, Vol. 025, page 343.

W 1/2 lot 5, Concession 8, 7 Mar 1851, CCB3, volume 025.

N 1/2 Lot 4, concession 9, February 1865, Record CCB3, volume 035.

S 1/2 lot 2, Concession 9, 13 April 1870, Record 01C1113, Volume 002

All in Rawdon Twp., Hastings County, Ontario.

This is the Atlas featured on the above website.  Placing the time period of the link above at 1878.

Hastings and Prince Edward Counties (Ontario Map Ref #28 and #29)
Illustrated historical atlas of the counties of Hastings and Prince Edward, Ont.
Toronto : H. Belden & Co., 1878.

Phillip and his family appear in the 1861 Canadian Census, in Rawdon, Twp., Hastings Co., Ontario #26 on page, 12.

Line 1, Philip Brown, farmer, Ireland, C. England, age 45, male, married, log, 1 story, 1 family, all members of family. Margret Brown, Ireland, C. England, age 43, female, married. Wm. Brown, Laborer, born Canada, E. England, age 19 male, single, Francis Brown, born Canada, C. England, age 17, female, single, Elley Brown, born Canada, C. England, age 15, female, single, Henery Brown, laborer, born Canada, E. England, age 13 male, single, Diana Brown, born Canada, C. England, age 11, female, single, Matilda Brown, born Canada, C. England, age 9, female, single, Margret Brown, born Canada, C. England, age 7, female, single, Alvina Brown, born Canada, C. England, age 5, female, single, Hariet Brown, born Canada, C. England, age 1, female, single

Phillip and family are present in the 1871 Canadian Census, Rawdon Twp., District 62, No. 2, Div. page 19.

Line 11, 15, 70, Brown Philip, M. age 55, born Ireland, C. England, Irish, farmer, M. Brown, Margaret F, age 52, born Ireland, C. England, M. Brown, Thomas, M. age 24 born Ireland, C. of England, farmer. Brown, Diana, F, age 22, born Ireland, C. of England, Brown, Matilda, F, age 20, born Ireland, C. of England, Brown, Margaret, F, age 18, born Ireland, C. of England, Brown, Alvina F, age 11, born Ireland, C. of England, Brown, [Eliza], F, age 10, born Ireland, C. of England

Another decade later he is still in Hastings County, Ontario.  Phillip Brown Family, 1881 Canadian Census, Dist. No. 122, North Hastings, Twp. Radown, Div. #3, Ontario, page 3.  Unfortunately, he is now a widow but he is living with his son Thomas Henry and his wife Esther.

Line 17, 15, 15, Brown, Philip, M. age 65, Ireland, Ch of Eng., farmer, Widowed. Line 18, 16, 16 Brown Henry, M. 36, born Ontario, Ch. of Eng., farmer, M. Brown, [Hester] F, age 25, born Ontario, Ch of Eng., M. Brown, Arthur, M. age 6, born Ontario, Ch of Eng. Brown, Thomas, M, age 3, born Ontario, Ch of Eng. Brown, William, M, 7/12, born Ontario, Ch of Eng.

In the 1891 Canadian Census Phillip is alone and age 74.  Phillip Brown Family, 1891 Canadian Census, Dist. 74, North Hastings, SD N4 Rawdon, April 7, 1891, John ____, Ontario, pg. 2.

Line 9, W[ ] 9, Brown, Philip M, age 74, W, born Ireland, Parents born in Ireland, C. of England, Farmer, Read and write.

Margaret Browns death record is with the Schedule C of Deaths, County of Hastings, Div. Rawdon, at Ancestry.com.

No. 7. Margaret Brown, Feb. 10, 1878, Female, age 59, profession Spinster, born Ireland, died of consumption, Dr. Spragg, Informant, Phillip Brown, Farmer Rawdon, April 5, 1878, C. of England, Registrar Joseph Hogle #[134799] No. 7, pg. 290. 

Phillip appears several years later in the same record.

Philip Brown, April 7th, 1895, Male age 78 yrs, farmer, born Ireland, Cause of death suffocated by smoke, no physician, Informant Ernest Brown Harold, June 21, 1895, Ch of England, Registrar Thos. C. McConnell. #007063, page 145. 

A brief mention of Philip’s death was in the local paper:  Brown – In Rawdon, On April 7, Phillip Brown, age 78 years and 8 months.  There was no further information as to the name of the newspaper and the date this was published.

Another obituary was given to me, but I do not have the date or paper it was published in:

“Death of Philip Brown.”

On Sunday Evening last Philip Brown, one of the oldest residents of the township of Rawdon, came ot his death under peculiar circumstances.  About dusk on that evening a neighbor, Mr. Wright, called to see him at his house, where he was living alone, and on opening the door found the room full of smoke.  He called to Mr. Brown, and getting no reply, groped his way to the bedroom where he found Mr.Brown lying on the bed, partly dressed, and in an unconscious condition.  Mr. Wright took him in his arms and carried him out, calling other near neighbors to take care of Mr. Brown, he with others soon extinguished the fire. Mr. Brown, however, did not rally, and expired about ten minutes after being taken from the building.  The cause of the fire is a mystery. The deceased was over 78 years of age. The funeral took place on Wednesday, and was largely attended, service being held in St. John’s Church, Stirling. 

I recommend the Woodrow Family Tree at Ancestry.com under public trees as a good source.  This tree was created by Mrs. Freddie Knight the person I mentioned above.  Remember she has passed away so if you go to this tree I suggest you document it for it may be removed at some point.  There are other trees that you can also study at Ancestry regarding this family.

As you can see more research and verification of the documentation needs to be done on this family of Philip Brown and Margaret McMurray Brown.  At some point I will present what I know about their ten (10) children: William Brown (1841 to 1922), Frances Brown (1843 to 1933), Elizabeth Brown (1845 to 1921), Thomas Henry Brown (1846-1884), Diana Brown (1850-1902), Matilda June Brown (1851-1936), Margaret Brown (1854 to ____), Alvina Brown (1855-1943), Harriett Brown (1860 to ____) and Elsie Brown (unknown).

I think this is very interesting that this surname of McMurray is Irish.  On my mother’s Boardman side her grandmother Charlotte was also a McMurray but it is listed as Scottish.

The research that I have on the Brown family is through the courtesy of my cousin Bob Hayes.  He has graciously given me permission to share his research.  I visited Bob in Kelowna, BC in 2012 and he shared his findings with me.

When I first started this blog, I did not know a lot about the Brown family and others, like Bob, had done research on them.  I did a series of posts about George Brown and Esther King on this blog and touched a little on their children.  I refer you to that post dated December 4, 2010 titled:  George and Esther Brown’s Children. It was basically an overview of their family.  I have yet to delve into the lives of the children and will do that in future posts.

Here is the link to the post I wrote about George and Esther’s children.

http://boardmanbrown.wordpress.com/2010/12/04/george-esther-browns-children/

I would like to move forward and share what I know about Thomas Brown a brother to George.  What I have is a little of my own research and a lot of Bob’s.

It has been suggested that Thomas Brown was born on 20 March 1817 in Ireland to William and Elsie/Alice Brown. He married on 14 January 1841 to Mary Johnson in Belleville, Hastings Co., Ontario.

Source:  Baptisms, Marriages and Death Records of the St. Thomas Anglican Church, Belleville, Ontario, 1821-1874, McMillan University and Quinte Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society, #486 Marriages. 

Nothing much is known about Mary Johnson other than she may have been born in Ireland about 1820 and died around 1886. I have also seen the name spelled “Johnston.”

Thomas died on 4 August 1848 in Hastings County, Ontario and he was buried in the St. Thomas Anglican Church cemetery in Belleville.  This church wanted to do some remodeling and they discovered in the excavation that there were many more graves than they had realized.  The church burial records were lost so McMillan University and the Quinte Branch of Ontario Genealogical Society set about putting together a record of the marriages, baptisms and births for that church.  This book is available at the Trenton Public Library in the Quinte room.

The Ghosts and Hauntings website has a very interesting article about the history of this the St. Thomas Anglican Cemetery.

http://www.torontoghosts.org/index.php?/20080822389/Eastern-Ontario/Belleville-St.-Thomas-s-Church-Cemetery.html

Based on the above information the chances of finding a gravesite for Thomas and for that matter his father William or other Browns, is probably nill for St. Thomas.  I plan to visit this church cemetery in Fall of 2014 and we will see what I find and will post about it.

The information for Thomas’ death was found at the Anglican Diocese for Ontario based in Kingston, Ontario on page 318 for the St. Thomas Anglican Church of Belleville records.

Death of Thomas Brown 1848

Death of Thomas Brown 1848

Unfortunately the 1851 Canadian Census for Rawdon Twp. did not survive. We would not find Thomas but we might find Mary Brown with her children if it had survived.

Since Thomas died in 1848 he is also not in the in the Illustrated historical atlas of the counties of Hastings and Prince Edward, Ont. Toronto : H. Belden & Co., for 1878.  Other Browns are easy to find at the Canadian Digital Archives project website:  http://digital.library.mcgill.ca/countyatlas/search.htm

After Thomas’ death Mary remarried to a Thomas Vance.  The marriage took place on 21 January 1851 in Belleville at the St. Thomas Anglican Church. The marriage  is in the book I have cited above as #914 – Brown, Mary to Vance, Thomas 21.01.51.   The photo below is the register found at the Anglican Diocese for Ontario in Kingston page 393 for the St. Thomas Church registers.

Thomas Vance & Mary Brown Marriage 1851

Thomas Vance & Mary Brown Marriage 1851

Mary and Thomas appear in the 1861 Canadian Census in Rawdon Twp., Hastings Co.,, Ontario, page 26.

Line 18 Thomas Vance, farmer, Ireland, C of England, 44, male, M, 1 male
Mary Vance, Ireland, C of England, 40, female, M, 1 female
John Vance, born Canada, C of England, 8, male, S, 1 male
Robert Vance, born Canada, C of England, 6 male, S, 1 male
William Vance, born Canada, C of England, 4 male, S, 1 male
Margret J. Vance, born Canada, C of England, 2, female, S, 1 female
Henry Brown, labourer, born Canada, C of England, 19, male, S, 1 male
Elisabeth Brown born Canada, C of England, 18, female, S, 1 female
Phillip Brown, labourer, born Canada, C of England, 16, male, S, 1 male
Thomas Brown, born Canada, C of England, 14, male, S, 1 male. 

This gives us a great view of the whole family including the children from the first marriage of Mary.

There is more research to be done regarding this family such as probate/estates, land and cemetery work and determining what happened to the children, any further findings will be included in future posts.

Posted by: bonmac | August 1, 2014

The Origins of the McMurrays and Jacksons…

Last October 2013, I took a trip to Salt Lake City and attended the British Institute taking classes on English records research.  I also spent time in the Family History Library trying to find out more about the origins of my mother’s family.

I presented my research in England for the  Boardman’s in a previous post.  I found that they really did come from Lancashire, England.  I still have to do more confirming of the possible children I listed in my post but I find it very intriguing that the McMurray’s and Jacksons were also in Lancashire and came over to Canada about the same time?

Here is what I have found so far regarding the McMurray and Jackson connection.  I was inspired by cousins who have gone before me.  James and Mary are my 2nd great grandparents through their daughter my great-grandmother Charlotte Ann McMurray Boardman.

1.  The marriage of James to Mary Jackson took place on 25 January 1847 in Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

Source:  Church of England, Parish Registers for St. Peter’s Church, Liverpool, Lancashire, England.  Marriage of James McMurray to Mary Jackson, 25 January 1847, St. Peter, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, FHL#1656509 Marriages 1846 to 1849, pg. 233, Entry #465. 

2.  The birth of James, their son, 8 March 1849, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northampton Co., England. He was christened on 1 April, 1849 at All Saints, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northampton Co., England.

Source:  Church of England Parish Registers, Parish Registers of All Saints Church, Newcastle-upon-Tyne 1600 to 1940, Baptism, 1844 to 1864. FHL#1068964, ITem 2 pg. 202 No. 1615, April 1, 1849.

3.  Source:  Anne Jackson Family 1851 Returns of England and Wales Census, Liverpool, Lancashire, England. Civil Parish: Liverpool Ecclesiastical parish Pembroke Place St. Silas, Town: Liverpool, County Lancashire County, England, Reg. District Liverpool, Sub Reg Islington, ED 1k, Hse #41, Piece 2184, Folio 348, page 13. This census was difficult to read.

 41, 3 [Walkenson] Ann Jackson, age 67, Head, Widow, 67, occupation _____, born Lancashire, William Jackson, son, age 24, occupation ___________, born Cumberland, Longtown, Richard Jackson, son, age 21, occupation _________, born Cumberland, Longtown, Jame McMurray, son-in-law, age 25 stonemason, born Scotland, Mary McMurray, daughter, age 29, occupation _____________, born Cumberland, Longtown, James McMurray, grandson, age 2, Northampton Newcastle.

There is more to do on this family but I am not very hopeful for further research in England.

Posted by: bonmac | July 25, 2014

More about Emma Ward Brown!

I do not know much about my great-grandmother Emma Ward Brown.  She was born in Strathroy 13 March 1851 and died in Winnipeg on 20 April 1905.  She is buried in the St. John’s Cemetery.  She married Richard Brown in Port Huron, St. Clair, Michigan on 9 January 1874.  Her first name is confusing because I have seen it as Emma and Emily.  Her death certificate and tombstone say “Emma.”  I am trying to determine who her parents area in the Strathroy area.  There are lots of Wards buried in both Middlesex and Lambton counties.

I am pondering this but I have this faded very bad photo of an unknown woman in a lovely white dress among the collection of Brown and Boardman photographs my cousins gave me. Could this be Emma?

Unknown woman in white

Unknown woman in white

WomanwithUmbrellawhitedress - Copy

Unknown woman the full photo

I recently tried searching newspapers in Winnipeg hoping to find out more about her death in 1905.   I did find this and wonder who all these people are.  The listings are from some of the work places of her sons Charles and Arthur.

The funeral of Mrs. R. Brown took place at 4 o’clock on Sunday afternoon to St. John’s cemetery from the family residence, 175 Magnus avenue. The floral contributions were: 

Cross, R. and F. Lough

Wreath, Clark, Bros. & Co., Ltd.

Wreath, employees Clark Bros. & Co.

Spray, Mr. and Mrs. Ruckle

Spray, Mrs. Bliss

Spray, Mr. and Mrs. II. Scott

Spray, Bertie and Edna Kirk

Spray, J.A. Thompson

Spray, Mrs. McCallum

Pillow, the family star W. Paine

Spray Mrs. and Miss Stobbs

Spray, Alice Holman

Crescent, R. Boardman

Spray, Mr. and Mrs. Bussell

Spray, Jos. St. Mars

Spray Mr. and Mrs. Osborne

Spray, Mrs. Newman

Wreath, Fellow Workmen

Spray, Fred J. Holland staff

Wreath, Miss Alice Denner

Source:  Wed, April 26, 1905, Manitoba Morning Free Press (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) page. 2

The Winnipeg Free Press, had a little bit on her death on April 21, 1905,

Obituary for Emma Brown died yesterday, OBITUARY – Emma Brown, beloved wife of Richard Brown, of 175 Magnus street, died yesterday, aged 54 years. Besides her husband she leaves two sons and one daughter.

The Manitoba Free Press had another article dated April 22, 1905, pg. 7, col. 5

The late Mrs. R. Brown of 176 Magnus street, whose death was announced, in the Free Press yesterday morning, had been a resident of the city for the past twenty-four years, having come here from Strathroy, Ont. Her friends and acquaintances will no doubt learn with regret of her demise. Her illness has extended over a period of nearly thirteen months, during which time she has suffered constantly. She leaves to mourn her loss a husband, two sons, Charles W. Brown of the Fred. J. Holland agency, limited, and Arthur Brown, of the staff of Clark Bros. & Co., limited; also one daughter, Ethel. The funeral will leave the family residence for St. John’s cemetery to-morrow afternoon at 4 o’clock.

Posted by: bonmac | July 18, 2014

William Brown Revisited!

In 2012 when I traveled to Ontario and Quebec, I made arrangements to visit the Anglican Diocese in Kingston, which they call the Diocese of Ontario, to search the records for the Brown family.

The post where I wrote about my visit was done on June 20, 2012 titled “Kingston, an Anglican Diocese office, the OGS Conference.” http://boardmanbrown.wordpress.com/2012/06/20/kingston-an-anglican-diocese-office-the-ogs-conference/

William Brown is the progenitor of the Brown family that came to Canada in 1830.  John Percy Clement a descendant wrote about his knowledge of the family.  The reference is to George Brown a son of William and Elsie and the line I am descended from.  Bob Hayes another descendant and my cousin prepared a manuscript and here is some of what John wrote, the corrections are Bob’s:

I might say that my mother’s father, George Brown was born about 1803 [sic, 1801; son of William Brown and Alice/Elsie Tymond] in the county of Longford, Ireland. In 1830, he came to Canada [with his father and various siblings, his mother having died in Ireland] on board a sailing ship, the only means of crossing at that time and taking three weeks to make the journey.

When somewhere in the Atlantic, a faster vessel overtook them with the news that King George IV was dead and William IV had succeeded him. My grandfather Brown landed in Montreal with, as he said, “tin cents” in his pocket. Before long he moved to Ontario where, about 1831, he married Esther King who was born in Cavan, Ireland about 1814 [probably 1812]. 

According to my information King George IV died on June 26, 1830 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, United Kingdom, placing the Browns on the ocean about this time but we do not know where on the ocean.

We know that George came with his father.  We do not know for sure how many siblings came over.  It is generally believed that the children who were in Canada were:  George, Thomas, Philip and Henry.  There is strong evidence that a sister also came by the name of  Catherine.  It was thought a Jeremiah was part of the family but he is now suspect.  I will post about these findings in the future.

In my post dated December 23, 2010, I wrote about what was known about William and his wife Elsie (or Alice).  It was not much.  The post is titled:  “George’s Parents: William and Elsie Brown.”  I have made some revisions to the names of the children in that post which you can access on this blog.

What I learned at the Anglican Diocese of Ontario in Kingston was that William Brown died in Hastings County on 31 May 1848 and he was much older than was believed.  This is from the St. Thomas Anglican church records at the Diocese:

Brown Buried:  William Brown of Rawdon, who died on the 31st Ulto, aged eighty-seven years, was buried on the 2nd day of June 1848 by me John Grier, Rector, Present: Henry Brown and George Brown. #453. 

William is also listed in the “Baptisms, Marriage & Death Records of St. Thomas Anglican Church, Belleville, Ontario 1821-1874, McMasters University and Quinte Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society book.  He is buried in the church cemetery, however, his grave may have been lost because the upkeep had not been good and the records were difficult to compile.

This means that William was born about 1761 and he was 69 years old when he came to Canada. He was not a young man.  So far I have found no probate/estate file for William in Hastings County but that might mean he did not own the land.

His son Henry Brown was featured in the Commemorative Biographical Record of the County of Lambton, Ontario, J.H. Beers., 1906:

pg. 128: Henry Brown father of Mrs. Yates, was born Nov. 5, 1820 in Ireland. He was of Holland descent, however, his ancestors having come over with King William through his parents, William and Alice (Tymond) Brown, were also born in Ireland, where the latter died. She was a granddaughter of John Tymond, the military engineer who built the Tymond iron bridge, in County Limerick, Ireland, which was name after him. After his wife’s death William Brown came to Canada with his family and settled in Hastings County, where his life closed. He was the father of a family of twelve children, all of whom have passed away. The father of Mrs. Yates was the youngest of this large family and he was afforded excellent educational advantages in Ireland. After coming to Canada he taught school for a short time, after which he engaged in farming. On Dec. 5, 1840, Henry Brown as married to Miss Margaret Orr, who was born in 1824, near the city of Belfast, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Carter) Orr, who were born and reared in Ireland, and died there. Henry Brown was a farmer in his younger days, and later on engaged in work as a clerk for the village of Sterling, Hastings County, and his penmanship may yet be seen in the old deeds and official papers of that time. During the Mackenzie rebellion he served as soldier for three years and was honorably discharged. In 1861 Mr. Brown removed to Lambton County and settled in Oil Springs, where he became interested in the handling of real estate and in the production of oil. In 1863 he was elected the first town clerk of Oil Springs, a position he held with the greatest efficiency for a number of years. He was foremost in all progressive movements here, was a charter member of the Masonic fraternity, and filled official positions in the lodge for a considerable period. During his whole life he was an upright, honorable, public -spirited man solicitous for the welfare of the community. The death of this good citizen took place Sept. 18, 1899, and that of his widow, in the following year, the only survivor of their family being their daughter Mrs. Yates.

There is also a biography of George C. Yates who married Henry’s daughter Anne Jane Brown.

So in summary what we know of William Brown is that:

1.  He was 87 years old at death in 1848 so that means he was born in 1761.

2.  His son George was born about 1801 in the county of Longford, Ireland.  It is believed that George was the oldest.

3.  That William married a Elsie or Alice Tymond,  A granddaughter of John Tymond, see bio of Henry Brown.  She died before he came to Canada.  I am not having much success at finding information about  John Tymond or about the bridge and his connection to it online, so I need to move to digging into Irish records.

4.  They came in through Montreal in 1830 about June.  Unfortunately few Canadian immigration records survived before 1865, so I have not had any luck determining the ship they came on.

5.  William died in Hastings County in 1848 and he is buried there.

6.  There were twelve children of which is looks like 4 were in Hastings County at the time of his death.  His son Thomas followed William and died in August of 1848 and is also buried in St. Thomas.

There is work to be done to learn more about William Brown and his other children, origins and wife.

——

Please note:  They have a new website url for the Diocese: http://ontario.anglican.ca/wp/the-anglican-diocese-of-ontario-archives-adoa/

Posted by: bonmac | May 30, 2014

The Boardman’s of Lancashire, England

In October 2013, I took a trip to Salt Lake City to attend the British Isles Research Institute. The link shows you the new 2014 class list.  I took the class: “Pre-1850 English Records,” for the 2013 series.   I was there a week and took the time to do research at the Family History Library on the Boardman Family.

In the post dated December 12, 2012, New Info:  Thomas and Edmund Boardman are Brothers! I wrote about finding an 1851 English Census that was very burned but it was still enough to feature my family.  I learned that Thomas Boardman was an older brother to my great-grandfather Edmund Boardman.  Thomas Boardman kept appearing in records in New Brunswick and I knew there was some connection.

Their father was Edmund Boardman and the mother was probably Zelia, although her first name is not clear.  I had finally jumped the pond (Atlantic Ocean) to England. My mother, Marjorie, was correct they did come from Lancashire, England.

I am going to share with you what I have found, but, please understand that this is the beginning of the research in England and it all needs to be verified with original records and more.

Here is an abstract of the 1851 Census for England and Wales:

19th Century Districts

19th Century Districts

Edward Boardman, 42, Tycha Boardman 35, Thomas Boardman 16, Edmund Boardman 3, Elizabeth Ment (servant) 22.  Oldham, Lancashire, England (Oldham Below Town) St. Mary’s parish, ED 1h, House sched #42.  Image 785 Ancestry.com.

Based on my research at the Family History Library and at Ancestry, I have come up with the following children that might be members of this family.  The 13 years difference between Thomas and Edmund means there probably were more children in between and possibly after.

Edmund Boardman, 2nd great-grandfather, was possibly born in about 1811 in Rochdale, Lancashire, England and his wife Tycha (Zelia) possibly born in 1816 in Rochdale.

Second great-grandmother “Tycha” Boardman is a problem because I have found several possible variations in the spelling of her name:  Ozela, Ezilia, Nelia, Zela, Cecilia and Zelia. This is going to make it difficult to find her.  I place their marriage about 1831 give or take a few years. Now my great-grandfather and mother Edmund and Charlotte named a little girl of theirs: Ellen Zelia Alma C.  This child did not survive and is buried in the West Branch Presbyterian Cemetery in Weldford, Kent Co., New Brunswick.

The possible children are:

1.  Mary Boardman, christened 9 Sep 1832, St. Chad, Rochdale, Lancashire, England. Died 7 December 1835, St. Mary, Rochdale, Lancashire, England.

Source: Baptism: 9 Sep 1832 St Chad, Rochdale, Lancs.
Mary Boardman – [Child] of Edmund Boardman & Ezilia
Abode: Catches
Occupation: Butcher
Baptised by: W. H. Twemlow Curate
Register: Baptisms 1832 from the Bishop’s Transcripts, Page 78, Entry 620
Source: LDS Film 1342496

2. Thomas Boardman born 27 May 1834, Rochdale, Lancashire, England, Christened 10 July 1836, St. Chad, Rochdale, Lancashire, England.  Migrated to New Brunswick about 1851 and married Rebecca, had two children and then ended up in Massachusetts where I lose his trail, leaving Rebecca with his son William?

Source: Name: Thomas Boardman, Birth date: 27 May 1834, age 2, Baptism date 10 Jul 1836, Parish: Rochdale, St. Chad, Father’s name Edmund Boardman, Mother’s name Zelia Boardman, Ref #L48/1/3/6, Item # 3, Archive Roll 644.

a.  William T. Boardman born about Dec 1857 in Quebec. He died about 1920 in Marshalltown, Marshall, Iowa and is buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Marshall Co. Iowa, he married Althea Sears 26 Jan 1878 in Moncton, Westmorland, New Brunswick.  Althea is buried near him b. Mar 1856 in New Brunswick, died about 1936 in Marshalltown, Marshall Co., Iowa.  They had Jennie, Bessie, Nellie, Fay L., Frank H.B.

b.  Samuel Boardman born about 1859 in New Brunswick and by 1881 he was in Lisgar, St. Clements, Manitoba, Canada and the trail goes cold.

3. John Boardman was born 10 Apr 1836 in Rochdale, Lancashire, England, christened the same day as Thomas 10 July 1836, St. Chad, Rochdale, Lancashire, England.

Source: Name: John Boardman, Birth date: 10 Apr. 1836, age 0, Baptism date 10 Jul. 1836, Parish Rochdale, St. Chad, Father’s name Edmund Boardman, Mother’s name Zelia Boardman, Ref #L48/1/3/6, Item Number 3, Archive Roll 644.

4. Samuel Boardman christened 7 Jan 1838, St. Chad, Rochdale, Lancashire, England.

Source: Name: Samuel Boardman, Baptism Date: 7 Jan 1838, Parish: Rochdale, St. Chad, Father’s name Edmund Boardman, Mother’s name Nelia Boardman, Re# L48/1/3/7, Item 4, Archive Roll 644.

5. Maria Boardman born 26 Jul 1839, Rochdale, Lancashire, England, christened 18 Aug 1839, St. Chad, Rochdale, Lancashire, England, died 25 Jul 1841, Rochdale, Lancashire, England.

Source:  Name:  Maria Boardman, Birth date:  26 Jul 1839, age 0, Baptisms Date:  18 August 1839, Rochdale, St. Chad, Father’s Name Edmund Boardman, Mother’s Name, Ezela Boardman, Ref #L48/1/3/7, Item 1, Archive Roll 645.

6.  Eliza Emma Boardman christened 24 Oct 1841, St. Chad, Rochdale, Lancashire, England, buried 3 Dec 1845, St. Chad, Rochdale, Lancashire, England.

Source: Name: Eliza Emma Boardman, Baptism Date: 24 Oct. 1841, Parish Rochdale, St. Chad, Father’s Name Edmund Boardman, Mother’s Name Zela Boardman, Ref #L48/1/3/8, Item Number 2, Archive Roll. 645.

7. Cecilia Boardman christened 5 Nov 1843, St. Chad, Rochdale, Lancashire, England, buried 24 Dec 1845 St. Chad, Rochdale, Lancashire, England.

Source – Name: Cecillia Boardman, Baptism Date 5 Nov. 1843, Parish: Rochdale, St. Chad, Father’s name Edmund Boardman, Mother’s name Cecilia Boardman, Ref #L48/1/3/8, Item #2, Archive Roll 645.

8.  William Boardman:  The BMD as Birth 10/1851 Oct-Nov-Dec 1850.  So I need further information to confirm if he is a son of this couple.

9. Edmund Boardman born 23 May 1847, Oldham, Lancashire, England.  Christened 21 Nov 1847, St. Mary’s, Oldham, Lancashire, England.  Died 18 October 1908, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.  Buried in the Elmwood Cemetery in Winnipeg.

Source – Name: Edmund Boardman, Baptism Date 21 Nov. 1847, Parish Oldham, St. Mary, Parish as it appears Oldham, Father’s name Edmund Boardman, Mother’s name Ozela Boardman. Parish: Oldham, St. Mary, Ref #GB127.L185/1/3/9

My search has used ages as a reference, names, location and so far only the Family History Library and Ancestry.  There is still more to do, so these children are tentative till I can prove them.

Did Edmund and Zelia (I am leaning towards this name) come to Canada, or did they stay in England?   In my previous post: “Great Grandfather Edmund Boardman and more news accounts of his death!” dated April 15, 2014, I learned that Edmund came to London, Ontario and then went to New Brunswick.

There is a 1861 Canadian census that has for London, Middlesex, Ontario  a listing as follows:

Ed. Boardman, Butcher, England, Ch. of England, age 55, 1 male, Frame, 1 story, 1 family, q. of land 18×100 ft.  L. Boardman, England, Ch. of England, age 46,Female. Ed Boardman, England, Church of England, 12, male, attended school, [Jos or Joh] Boardman 10. 

Source:  1861 Canadian Census, London, Middlesex, Canada West, C-1097-1908, page 137.

This is exciting news.  Now I can search for probate/estate, burial, land or other records to find my second great grandparents.

In searching for the older brother Thomas who would be 27 years old in 1861, I do find a Thomas in Algoma but I am not sure it is him in the 1861 Canadian Census. This man looks like he is married to an Eliza, working as a store clerk and his religion is Wesleyan Methodist.

It the 1871 Canadian Census there are two Thomas Boardmans, one is living in London, Middlesex, Ontario with Jane as his wife.  He is a butcher which is very interesting.  The one I know about is the Thomas who is living in Shediac, Westmorland, New Brunswick and his wife is Rebecca.  She could be Rebecca Jane? In the 1871 census the son is Henry for London and in Shediac there is a William and Samuel?   This implies that Thomas may have married his wife in London, Ontario.

Now I could do a page by page study of the 1861 London, Middlesex census but there are 2881 pages so I think I need to narrow things down.

At some point there was a family bible and there is family lore that Edmund had a family history, but apparently it is lost.  Charlotte my great grandmother has been implicated as the culprit, taking the bible with her from New Brunswick to Winnipeg.  My family does not have this information, if we did, I think they would have preserved it.  Wouldn’t that be great if it was found?

At this point my mind is wildly speculating about the possibilities for learning more about the family in London, Ontario and more.  As usual in genealogy, you answer one question and many more pop up.  This is where I am at this time and of course, there is more to do.

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