Category Archives: Henry Brown 1820 to 1899

The Brown Families of Hastings County, Ontario

Sign Post entering Hastings County on the Trans Hwy

Sign Post entering Hastings County on the Trans Hwy

On this blog I have shared some information about the Browns who settled in Hastings County, Ontario.  I have focused on George Brown because he was my line.  I then shared about his son Richard Brown who married Emma Ward and moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba.

George and Esther Brown migrated from Hastings County to Lambton County and then onto Lapeer County in Michigan and died there.  I traveled to these locations in the Fall of 2014 and shared about those visits in this blog.  They had at least 10 children and I only come down from one line: Richard the 8th child.  There is quite a bit more to share on other collateral lines and it is truly a Canadian Story.

A brother, Henry Brown also migrated to Lambton County, Ontario and settled there.  He and his family are buried in Oil Springs which is south of Petrolia.  I have shared about Henry and Margaret (Orr) Brown’s family and featured their tombstones on this blog.  I feel that I have covered Henry Brown and his life pretty well.

I have not really shared about the families of the other two brothers that we know about out of the 11 children that are supposed to have been born to William and Elsie/Alice Brown.  I have shared the burial information about William Brown in past posts.

Hastings County Views

Hastings County Views

The two other brothers are Thomas and Phillip Brown, who settled in Hastings County and stayed there are buried there in the St. Thomas Anglican Church Cemetery (destroyed) and Stirling Cemetery.  I have placed memorials and tombstones when possible on Find A Grave at both Stirling Cemetery and the Saint Thomas Anglican Church Cemetery in Belleville.

Thomas Brown married Mary Johnston lived and stayed in Hastings County.  They had four children.  After Thomas died in 1848 Mary remarried to Thomas Vance and had four more children.

North of Stirling

North of Stirling

Phillip Brown also stayed in Hastings County marrying Margaret McMurray. They had about 10 children.

I cannot claim credit for all this research because my cousin Bob a descendant of one of George and Esther’s children and sister to my Richard by the name of Matilda Jane Brown was his inspiration for digging and finding these Browns. I would not have had the patience and I am so very grateful he has been very kind and shared his research with me and given me permission to share.  I have taken it and expanded it and added in other researchers.  Bob did this all by correspondence and I have found evidence of his paper trail as I made my way across Ontario.

It has not been easy, the surname of Brown can be very difficult to research because of the use of repeated first names like: Thomas.  Hopefully I have cleaned up the confusion and found enough information that further research can be done by descendants.  The loss of earlier records has also made the process difficult.

I do want to encourage that you take what has been shared and revisit it and double check it.  I am also willing to make changes and updates so if you think I have not quite gotten the information correct please contact me via the comments and let’s make it right.

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Revisiting Henry Brown in Oil Springs, Ontario

Henry Brown was a son of William Brown and Elsie/Alice Tymond.  He moved around a bit in his life and finally settled in Oil Springs, Lambton County, Ontario.

I have written about Henry and his family in the post on this blog dated:

August 29, 2014 titled: The Children of William Brown & Elsie: Henry Brown.

I also visiting the Oil Springs Cemetery in September of 2014 and viewed Henry’s tombstone which was shared by his wife Margaret and daughter Ann.

See the post on this blog dated September 22, 2014 “Ontario Wanderings: Oil Springs and Their Cemetery.” In this post I shared my visit to the cemetery but really didn’t feature the tombstone in detail.

This side of the stone features the Yates Family:

Yates & Brown Tombstone

Yates & Brown Tombstone

Yates Tombstone Oil Springs - front side

Yates Tombstone Oil Springs – front side

YATES:  George Cornell Yates, 1838 to 1901

His Wife Ann Jane Brown 1841 to 1935 (daughter of Henry & Margaret Brown)

Their children:

Harriett Caroline Yates 1878 to 1887

Frederick Charles Yates 1880 to 1957

Henrietta Yates 1873 to 1970

Clifford Russell Yates 1883 to 1973

Henry & Margaret Brown

Henry & Margaret Brown

Yates Tombstone Backside featuring Henry & Margaret, Oil Springs Ontario

Yates Tombstone Backside featuring Henry & Margaret, Oil Springs Ontario

This is the backside of the tombstone in the Oil Springs Cemetery.

Benjamin Yates 1812 to 1888 His wife Phoebe Cornell.  It is my opinion these are the parents of George Cornell Yates.

Henry Brown 1820 to 1899 His Wife Margaret Orr 1824 to 1900. These are Ann’s parents.

These stones are also featured at Find A Grave.  Henry and Margaret Brown may have had a second daughter Elizabeth born in July 1866 but she didn’t survive dying 17 October 1866 in 8 Concession of Rawdon Twp., Hastings Co., Ontario.

I have shared in the posts I have indicated in this blog about Henry Brown and Margaret Orr his wife.  Unfortunately, we do not know much about Margaret and her family.  Her father might have been Joseph Orr and her mother a Mary Carter.

In the next posts I want to share more about Henry’s brothers’ families, Thomas and Philip Brown who remained in Hastings Co., Ontario.

Ontario Wanderings: Oil Springs and their Cemetery…

After visiting Petrolia I headed further south on Hwy 21 to Oil Springs.  I passed Oil City and their cemetery and was soon in the town of Oil Springs.  I drove around a little and was sad to see many stores vacant an abandoned.

This is where Henry Brown and Margaret lived.  He was an uncle to my great-grandfather Richard Brown and brother to George Brown my 2nd great-grandfather.

My biggest task for Lambton was to see the towns but mostly to find the Oil Springs Cemetery and seek out the tombstones for Henry, Margaret Brown and their daughter Anne’s family the Yates.

The Oil Springs Cemetery is located on S. Plank Road.  You turn onto Oil Springs Line to the right going west from Hwy 21 drive a short while till you find S. Plank.  It is paved but also a little gravelly and not a fancy highway with a yellow line.

So. Plank to Oil Springs Cemetery

So. Plank to Oil Springs Cemetery looking south

Oil Springs Cemetery

Oil Springs Cemetery

The address Oil Springs Cemetery

The address Oil Springs Cemetery

As I was wandering this cemetery I heard a noise and there was a man driving by on a very old style motorcycle which was making puttering sounds.  A few minutes later he came roaring by.  You never know what you will see when you go cemetery hunting.

The map I had for the cemetery took a little while to figure out but I finally decided that the stones I was looking for were closer to the gate and fence on the west side of the cemetery. This cemetery is on both sides of the road.  It is a medium-sized cemetery so study a cemetery book before you go to get an idea where you need to look.  It is also on a slope toward the back.

Overview photo Oil Springs

Overview photo Oil Springs

It took a while but I found them up near the fence and the tombstone is huge. This side of the stone’s information is on Find A Grave under Yates.  The other side is not featured.

Yates & Brown Tombstone

Yates & Brown Tombstone

On the other side of the stone we find Henry and Margaret Orr Brown. Henry is a second great grand-uncle to me.

Henry & Margaret Brown

Henry & Margaret Brown and others…

Me with Henry & Margaret Brown & Yates

Me with Henry & Margaret Brown & Yates

Here I am with Ann Jane Brown’s side, Henry and Margaret’s only daughter and child, a 1st cousin 3 x’s removed.

DSC08832

You can see that it is very large stone and it is tilting.  I am 5 ft 4 inches and you can get an idea of just how large it is and massive.

Ontario Wanderings: Lambton County Archives

I headed for Lambton County and the town of Wyoming.  It would take about 40 minutes to get there and thankfully the weather had improved so my trip was just fine.

I entered Lambton County and was soon at the town of Wyoming.  This town is a long town on a north to south axis.  Lambton County is where George and Esther Brown migrated to from Hastings County.  They are my second great grandparents.  Apparently George had a store there and was postmaster.  Richard Brown his son and my great-grandfather was assistant postmaster and he met Emma/Emily Ward there.  They married in Port Huron, Michigan.

I was there to see the lay of the land and the towns and for finding Richard’s uncle and George’s brother, Henry and other Browns and Wards.  Henry had stayed in Lambton moving down to Oil Springs.

Finding the Lambton County Archives was not easy but I did.  It turned out they were right across from the north city sign announcing the town of Wyoming. The library was set back from the road.  It is near the big county building.

http://www.lclmg.org/lclmg/Museums/LambtonCountyArchives/tabid/110/Default.aspx

Wyoming Sign South on Hwy 21

Wyoming Sign South on Hwy 21

The sign below is out front of the county buildings.  I am viewing this looking north on highway 21 (Broadway).  http://www.lambtonmuseums.ca/

Lambton County Signs

Lambton County Signs

Library is way back from Hwy 21

Library is way back from Hwy 21

Study the photo above and then turn around 360 degrees and you will see this building with the sign on the side.

Library sign for Lambton County Archives

Library sign for Lambton County Archives

Very important that you understand it is called the Lambton County Archives Library….Do not rely on GPS it will mess you up.

The Lambton County Archives Library

The Lambton County Archives Library

My first chore was to change my wet shoes and socks to dry ones after stomping in two cemeteries they were soaked.

The cost for researching is $5.00 for the day and of course they have you sign in. The archives was well laid out, with plenty of tables.  I didn’t feel cramped. They have stacks, microfilm readers, atlas’ and a whole lot more.

My first goal was to learn more about the Wyoming Cemetery and the Oil Springs Cemetery and make sure I had the cemetery book information.  The Wyoming Cemetery shares the area with the catholic cemetery Mt. Calvary, which is what I see on my Microsoft Streets and Trips software.  I suspected a joint cemetery situation.

The Stacks at Lambton archive

The Stacks at Lambton archive

DSC08762

The librarian on duty was very nice but kept correcting my pronunciation of the cities and locations.  It was funny at first and then it became painful.  She was also a little overbearing regarding the research but I am sure she is use to people who don’t know what they are doing.

Getting the information about the cemeteries was a good thing and I was happy. I did study their newspaper indexes and learned about all the indexing of the local newspapers and she helped me to find Henry’s death announcement.  I think he had three lines. HA!  Since I already had quite a bit of information on George and Esther Brown, his brother Henry all thanks to Bob my cousin, I really didn’t need to spend that much more time. It was not the best research time because of the problem with the librarian.  So if you go be ready to work with her.

It was time for lunch and I headed to Sam’s Restaurant which I had seen when I trying to find the archive. My lunch was a hamburger and not bad.  It was not as happily decorated as the cafe in Strathroy but it was good enough.  I like these small town cafes as a place to stop and relax. The man at the cash register didn’t know where Isabella street was but he found it for me.  I needed to know if I was to go south or north.

Here is the link to the Lambton County Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society.

http://www.lambton.ogs.on.ca/

The next stop was to find the Wyoming Cemetery on Isabella Street.